Hey, everyone! I've been listening to a lot of Lincoln Brewster's stuff recently, and I've noticed that he leans pretty heavily on nice tap-tempo delays for his supper cool, neato verse riffs. I've only ever been using multi-effects units since I started playing electric about a couple years ago, and I'm not 100% sure how to use real delay pedals with tap tempos.

So here's one question - do you just tap in the tempo of the song your playing right on the spot? I know one could run into serious trouble if you set up your delay time for one tempo beforehand and then your drummer pulls fast or drags the tempo.

Another question - what's a good delay pedal to use that has tap tempos and different types of delays? I've seen a friend use the green Line 6 delay unit, but he didn't explain its operation, and he didn't even use it that much that I'm aware of.

I have some nice delays that I like on my Digi Tech Rp350, but in order to turn it on or off, you have to use the expression pedal, or you have to line up two presets next to each other - one with delay and one without. I like to be able to use the expression pedal to control other perimeters like amp drive or on/off for a distortion box or effects box model.

Yeah, this is lengthy, but I just really want to learn all I can.

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Ha, ISWYDT!!

My Eventide Timefactor arrived on the UPS truck today. I'm sooooo excited. I've heard it used live and watched the youtube videos on it over and over again. I can't wait to figure out how to use it. I had to sell my DD-20 and my DL-4 to get it, but I think it's going to be worth it.
Man, you're serious about delay! Let us know how that works out for you!

Jason,

I have never known Lincoln Brewster to rely on a delay with Tap Tempo in any of his albumns or any live environments. I have seen Lincoln play quite  a few times at Namm and I've never seen him play using Tap Tempo or Pre-Programmed delays. He has only used a Line6 PodLiveXT but only for amp simulation and he used that live for only about a year. I can give you a link to support my word in which he keeps it simple and uses a Boss DD-3.

http://www.bossus.com/boss_users_group/article.php?ArticleId=791

http://www.uberproaudio.com/who-plays-what/495-lincoln-brewster-gui...

http://www.lincolnbrewster.com/extras.php

Please everyone, let's not forget that you DON'T need a delay pedal with tap-tempo in order to have a versatile delay pedal. I actually like my DD-3 (which is not tap-tempo inductive) and prefer it over my DD-7 with the FS-5U. There is a reason why the DD-3 went from $103.99 to $139.99 in the last few month. I notice that the sound of my DD-3 is much clearer than the DD-7 when playing live. It's not easy to get dotted eighth notes on an analog delay pedal but it is possible to achieve it without tap tempo. You would just need to know how to dial it in. While these points are all valid, tap tempo can make delays more creative.

 

If you're going for Lincoln's style (Which by the pic, it looks like you are indeed a strat shredder as well!) you DONT need tap tempo, it isn't a must and I have yet to find a song where he has used tap tempo on. If you're going for Hillsong styles..well that's where tap tempo will come in as a must. All in all, if I were you, I might get a tap tempo just because you might need one down the road. Just wanted to clearify those things for everyone though :)

Sorry if this is a silly question, but can you please explain the difference between Lincoln Brewster's music and Hillsongs?  Thanks!

Lincoln Brewster's music is built on the American blues and locrian scales and so the progressions are much different from the average progressions of Christian worship, whilist Hillsong of Australia is built around progressions inspired by U2 and kicks it up a notch (outdoing U2 in a number of ways). Lastly, both are Worship, but it would be kinda dumb to place worship as a genre i geuss *since worship is an action* Lincon Brewster's music is harder rock with a soulful side of bluesy scales while Hillsong is more of (now) Contemporary style as it has more major scales and more common 1 4 & 5 progressions in their music. I wish i could speak more truth but there is much to do.

God bless!

Steve, that is incredibly helpful.  Thanks!  I don't pretend to understand all what you just said, but I guess I need to do my homework now.  Bless you!

Lincoln Brewster is frighteningly talented, I'm glad he's on our side. But American blues and locrian scales? (Technically, they aren't scales.) Are you sure? I'm not a big listener of Lincoln Brewster, so forgive me if I'm just dense, but I've never heard anything of his sound very locrian. It's hardly used by anyone other than dark metal players.  At one time it was even called the "devil's" mode. So from what I recall of his work, like "let the  praises ring", he is pretty heavy with major scale / ionian mode and does lots of pentatonics both in his melodies and guitar solos. Maybe some lydian here and there? 

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And when you mention American Blues with locrian, I've never heard the two used in the same sentence like that. Usually, when one thinks of blues, it's minor pentatonic blues scales and mixolydian / lydian. Do you mean mixolydian? That would be more of the SRV thing.

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Hey - just some thoughts mate.

Superimposing the locrian scale on a minor pentatonic gets you to what is commonly referred to as the "blues scale" (1 b3 4 #4 5 b7). This is a hexatonic scale (6 notes). Now, there is no one "blues scale" but this is the most common definition of the term "blues scale".

If you want to get into SRV he played notes that worked with the chords not just notes from a scale. He was more a: 1 2 b3 3 4 #4 5 6 b7 kinda guy...just playing what worked.

Hope that helps explain things. I know theory can make your head spin. I spent my first year of music school with a headache the size of Teas from my Harmony classes. God bless!

Perhaps from a theory standpoint, this is how one gets there. But from your own explanation, he's not actually playing locrian scales - right? 

I was just pointing out the link between the blues scale and the locrian mode. Not so much talking just about Lincoln Brewster's playing. Actually, I'm not very familiar with his stuff. I've heard a few of his cuts, but can't recall exactly what he was playing.

Ah yes - thanks for that. I'm not very schooled in theory.

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