I'm a huge fan of using a capo. In fact, I use one on almost every song just because I love to transpose. But other members of the band like to tease me about the fact that I never don't use my capo because I'm trying to avoid barre chords.

I would think that using a capo fluently is a great trait to have as a worship leader, and a guitarist, because it teaches you to transpose on the spot, in your head, and it's a lot easier to play and sing at the same time when you don't have to focus on your fingers. Does anybody else agree with me? Or am I just a freak? Haha.

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Right-on! If there is another acoustic player with me, I will capo up to get a different sound. There are all kinds of things one can do with them.
I agree, and I'll add the following.
1. The capo can be a convenience: it's easier to play some things with a capo, allowing you to worship more freely
2. The capo changes the "sound" of the guitar being played
3. (very important):
The acoustic "range" of a guitar with a capo on it is different than a guitar without. When you have multiple people in a team playing together, it's a good idea to find ways to separate the team members. I have three guitarists, so we work in different sonic areas in order to not be competing with each other. The ACguitar often is open chords, the rhythm eGuitar plays barre chords, and the lead is most often in the higher registers of the strings, with various different effects.
So... for some songs I'll put on a capo to allow the other guitar to play acoustic along and still provide different sound. A good example of this is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idA6fCAHVzs -- listen to the two ACguitars not stepping on each other. Really unusual with this song is that one of the guitars has chorus on it, but the effect is not mushy because the other guitar has a capo on.
Here's an interesting blog post from Planet Waves about creative ways to use a capo: http://planetwavesinsiders.blogspot.com/2010/03/creative-capos.html

I especially liked this paragraph:
"Some players with less appreciation of the importance of open chord voicings and string tension (and it’s effect on timbre) call capos “cheaters”. While it’s true that using a capo allows the “three-chord” guitar play the opportunity to play in any key without learning a new chord grip, capos can and are used in several creative ways. In fact, a beginning guitarist with a capo can play many things that a professional without one cannot. You’d be cheating your music by not investigating the many uses of a capo."

And this was tweeted recently by Lincoln Brewster: 'It's amazing what a capo can do"
http://twitter.com/lincolnbrewster/status/9665227819

'nuff said. :)
RIGHT-ON!! I can do any "chord grip" there is, but why do that and sacrifice the sound I want?
""a beginning guitarist with a capo can play many things that a professional without one cannot."."

HA! HA! NO FREAKEN WAY HA!!!!!
Whoever wrote that does not know what a "real" Professional is!!!! PERIOD!!!!
I know Pros, and they trounce of most great guitar players! That statment is like saying if you wear this shoe you can play basketball like Michael Jordan! AS IF!!!! (as I roll my eyes)

A capo is a tool, and I like tools.
A capo should be used for one of three reasons, and only for one of these three!!

So hear is a list of my capo rules.

1. Because you need it. (Transpositions, Creativity)

2. Beacuse your band mate needs it. (Transpositions, Creativity)

3.Because creatively you want it. (Transpositions, Creativity)

Creativity is the big thing do it because of your artistic needs.

A capo should never be a justifacation for not growing past "needing" one. It sould not be a crutch!

If you use one - then use it, but dilute yourself into thinking it makes you a better player. It doesnt!
If you dont use one - then dont, but dont think that makes you any better than others. Even if it does!


I belive that was the most balanced view of capos ever. ha ha ha ha.....
It is a lot easier for me to transpose on guitar with a capo than it is on keyboard (because even when I go up on keys, I still think about actually playing in that key). It's just a lot more natural on guitar because the chord structure is the same--all you're really doing is going up further on the guitar. God is awesome! (and not just because I've only been playing a little over 2 years and just turned 33 lol!)
I have at least 8 capos around... two in my work horse guitar case, two in my gig bag, one downstairs on the headstock of my guitar I keep down there, and a couple laying around in my guitar room. At least two are cut-capos... use to simulate DADGAD but in E. I am a lead worshiper, who plays guitar. I am the rhythm guitarist, but sometimes I am 2nd guitarist, so I need to cross chord -- if 1st guitarist is playing in open G, I may capo 3 and play in the E shape, or capo 5 and play in the D shape. I have the ability to play in most keys, but have trouble transposing to flats, so capo it is. I like Bb vocally... Capo 3, G shape works nicely. If someone else is playing that, I can go to capo 6 and use the E shape... its all good... as someone else said -- its a tool.
My nephew refuses to use a Capo, and he is an amazing player... but when he plays in Bb with all the barr chords, I sound better. It isn't about easy, it is about what brings the voie to the song... I think capo's are awesome, and serve a useful function, just as a lead electric guitarist uses effects pedals... just another tool.

I use the Nashville Notation System - 1 is the root, as in, play 145, 145, 145, 651...etc... if I know the numbers, I can play that in any key... I chose the chord shape based on the band, and what voicing/color I want to bring to the table.
I have at least 8 capos around... two in my work horse guitar case, two in my gig bag, one downstairs on the headstock of my guitar I keep down there, and a couple laying around in my guitar room. At least two are cut-capos... use to simulate DADGAD but in E. I am a lead worshiper, who plays guitar. I am the rhythm guitarist, but sometimes I am 2nd guitarist, so I need to cross chord -- if 1st guitarist is playing in open G, I may capo 3 and play in the E shape, or capo 5 and play in the D shape. I have the ability to play in most keys, but have trouble transposing to flats, so capo it is. I like Bb vocally... Capo 3, G shape works nicely. If someone else is playing that, I can go to capo 6 and use the E shape... its all good... as someone else said -- its a tool.
My nephew refuses to use a Capo, and he is an amazing player... but when he plays in Bb with all the barr chords, I sound better. It isn't about easy, it is about what brings the voie to the song... I think capo's are awesome, and serve a useful function, just as a lead electric guitarist uses effects pedals... just another tool.

I use the Nashville Notation System - 1 is the root, as in, play 145, 145, 145, 651...etc... if I know the numbers, I can play that in any key... I chose the chord shape based on the band, and what voicing/color I want to bring to the table.
I'm right there with you, Danny!
TRUE!! belive you are right! It is about the song.
When I purchased my first guitar the salesman insisted that a capo was an essential to playing the instrument. now after 9+ years of playing I agree, but not for the reasons he stated (simply transposition)
I echo what others have said, the capo is a tool not a crutch, use it creatively and you open a world of possibilities to both your playing and the tonality of your worship team. I have at least four different capos, short cut, notched, drop D and standard.
A good understanding of transposing and being able to use a capo fluently are important skills, but don't neglect the art of playing your instrument well whatever the situation.
Next week we are having an all guitar worship session, 6 guitars, and most definitely there will be capo's and alternate tunings used. Use the capo like you would a tuning or like the positioning of your strum / fingers in relation to the sound hole, create new tones and feels.
Barre chords have no character. Besides, some of us don't have the hand strength to play everything in barre chords. You use a capo to get chord fingerings and open string so that you can create a certain voicing. It's really cool when you know how to use it well.

Also - bravo for transposing. My other guitarist and I work to keep our voicing apart and separate. He uses the capo more often. It's also a great way to force you to learn the fretboard and where everything is.

Now do this - name your favorite capo...

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