I just want to get a view of how many of the 9,000 some members actually come by the forum. Comment if you came here and read this, please.

Views: 864

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I'm a visual tech in my church (Church of the Rock - North End Campus, Winnipeg Manitoba Canada) One thing that the leadership in the team emphasizes is that when you are on visual: during the worship, your job is to get the words onto the screen a moment BEFORE the congregation will be singing them. Sometimes that is not an easy task. And even when the worship tech has been through the songs during practice, the sequencing of verses and choruses, bridge, tag and ending can change.  Driving the confusion is that no matter how the song is laid out in whichever worship software we use, the musicians often have a different layout. They may also have MORE or LESS of the song than we do. So anything you as a worship leader can do to make our job easier by cueing us in on your cues, is wonderful!

You're here, and that matters. Thanks, Toni, for checking back more than I have.

Toni said:

I guess we're not likely to get a post from some of the 'popular recorded' members confirming an active presence here. :-/

Another great song, Joe!



Joe Aiken said:

Hi all, still here? Check out this song and give some feedback...
http://www.worshiptherock.com/forum/topics/the-king-of-the-world?gr...

oops, posted twice

Yeah, been fighting that battle (onscreen lyrics slightly ahead of the actual singing) but I think we're winning.  I put a comment at the top of our MediaShout file to remind the MS techs (who, at our church, generally show up about three minutes before the service starts, give or take five minutes - I always try to look and see that there's somebody at the desk before we start playing the song, and if there isn't... we don't start 'til there is...), and they've been pretty good at it.  I also removed the "blank" slide at the start of each lyric and asked them to be sure to put the first lyric screen up as soon as we start playing the song intro, so that if it's a different song than the one we're playing, we can stop and do something.  Happened about three weeks ago.  I also went through all our chord charts and MS lyrics and made sure we're (pretty darn) consistent about the order of verses, etc.

Rick Galbraith said:

I'm a visual tech in my church (Church of the Rock - North End Campus, Winnipeg Manitoba Canada) One thing that the leadership in the team emphasizes is that when you are on visual: during the worship, your job is to get the words onto the screen a moment BEFORE the congregation will be singing them. Sometimes that is not an easy task. And even when the worship tech has been through the songs during practice, the sequencing of verses and choruses, bridge, tag and ending can change.  Driving the confusion is that no matter how the song is laid out in whichever worship software we use, the musicians often have a different layout. They may also have MORE or LESS of the song than we do. So anything you as a worship leader can do to make our job easier by cueing us in on your cues, is wonderful!

This conversation makes me wonder once again if OHPs with the full song on a single sheet wasn't a better way to go.

Do many worship teams follow a set pattern on the songs (I'm guessing the answer is yes) or work the songs as they come? Worship times for us seem to have an increasingly improvisational nature.

I have not realized what a blessing it has been to have had, for the last twenty years, techs who come to worship team practice and run through the whole thing with us (I have been corrected many times by the tech - but the embarrassment has been worth it).

Charles Wolff said:

Yeah, been fighting that battle (onscreen lyrics slightly ahead of the actual singing) but I think we're winning.  I put a comment at the top of our MediaShout file to remind the MS techs (who, at our church, generally show up about three minutes before the service starts, give or take five minutes - I always try to look and see that there's somebody at the desk before we start playing the song, and if there isn't... we don't start 'til there is...), and they've been pretty good at it.  I also removed the "blank" slide at the start of each lyric and asked them to be sure to put the first lyric screen up as soon as we start playing the song intro, so that if it's a different song than the one we're playing, we can stop and do something.  Happened about three weeks ago.  I also went through all our chord charts and MS lyrics and made sure we're (pretty darn) consistent about the order of verses, etc.

Rick Galbraith said:

I'm a visual tech in my church (Church of the Rock - North End Campus, Winnipeg Manitoba Canada) One thing that the leadership in the team emphasizes is that when you are on visual: during the worship, your job is to get the words onto the screen a moment BEFORE the congregation will be singing them. Sometimes that is not an easy task. And even when the worship tech has been through the songs during practice, the sequencing of verses and choruses, bridge, tag and ending can change.  Driving the confusion is that no matter how the song is laid out in whichever worship software we use, the musicians often have a different layout. They may also have MORE or LESS of the song than we do. So anything you as a worship leader can do to make our job easier by cueing us in on your cues, is wonderful!


If you are more highly improvizational, then the real need is that your tech would know your cues and be able to lead you where you want to go. The on-stage display might not be correct (this is an option which you may not use). But the congregation would be blissfully unaware.

Toni said:

This conversation makes me wonder once again if OHPs with the full song on a single sheet wasn't a better way to go.

Do many worship teams follow a set pattern on the songs (I'm guessing the answer is yes) or work the songs as they come? Worship times for us seem to have an increasingly improvisational nature.

RSS

© 2018       Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service